Last edited by Arashigal
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates found in the catalog.

Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates

A. Gordon Edmund

Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates

by A. Gordon Edmund

  • 137 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Life Sciences Division, Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Reptiles, Fossil.,
  • Birds, Fossil.,
  • Teeth, Fossil.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 183-190.

    StatementA. Gordon Edmund.
    SeriesContributions - Life Sciences Division, Royal Ontario Museum ;, no. 52
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQL1 .T65 no. 52, QE861 .T65 no. 52
    The Physical Object
    Pagination190 p. :
    Number of Pages190
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3898896M
    LC Control Number81460885

      Edmund AG. Tooth replacement phenomena in lower vertebrates. Royal Ontario Museum Life Science Division Contribution ; 1– View Article Google Scholar Rogers R, Krause DWK, Rogers KC. Cannibalism in the Madagascan dinosaur Majungatholus atopus. Nature ; – pmid About this book. The Teeth of Non-Mammalian Vertebrates is the first comprehensive publication devoted to the teeth and dentitions of living fishes, amphibians and Teeth of Non-Mammalian Vertebrates presents a comprehensive survey of the amazing variety of tooth forms among non-mammalian vertebrates, based on descriptions of approximately species belonging to about .

      Tooth replacement is a continuous process occurring throughout the life of reptiles 8. Previous work stretching back almost years provides data on pre- .   Introduction. Owning true teeth is one of the great innovations of vertebrates. The acquisition of a dentition has led to a diversification of predation and oral processing patterns that can, at least in part, explain the tremendous evolutionary success of vertebrates (Pough et al., ).Today, vertebrates display a great diversity of dentitions in terms of tooth location, number, shape.

    The replacement teeth are seen on the lingual side of the functional tooth and slightly mesial to it. Both replacements appear to be exploiting the root of the functional tooth (Figs. 5D, 5E). The replacement tooth at position 12 appears to be better developed and lies closer to the neck of the functional tooth than that at position The Teeth of Non-Mammalian Vertebrates is the first comprehensive publication devoted to the teeth and dentitions of living fishes, amphibians and reptiles. The book presents a comprehensive survey of the amazing variety of tooth forms among non-mammalian vertebrates, based on descriptions of approximately species belonging to about families.


Share this book
You might also like
compendium of Kafir laws and customs

compendium of Kafir laws and customs

Qualitative methods in human geography

Qualitative methods in human geography

thirty-six immortal women poets

thirty-six immortal women poets

How to read a person like a book

How to read a person like a book

Can you make a contract?

Can you make a contract?

Mabels dreams

Mabels dreams

Electrochemistry of organic compounds

Electrochemistry of organic compounds

For Couples in Love

For Couples in Love

ON POWER & IDEOLOGY

ON POWER & IDEOLOGY

Hearings on VA specially adapted housing grant and the eligibility requirements for VA home loans of veterans of the Vietnam era

Hearings on VA specially adapted housing grant and the eligibility requirements for VA home loans of veterans of the Vietnam era

English decoration and furniture of the later XVIIIth century (1760-1820)

English decoration and furniture of the later XVIIIth century (1760-1820)

Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates by A. Gordon Edmund Download PDF EPUB FB2

Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates by Edmund, A. Gordon; Royal Ontario MuseumPages: Get this from a library. Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates. [A Gordon Edmund]. Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates. Edmund A.G. Life Sciences Division, Royal Ontario Museum, — ists are motivated by one basic aim — to find general rooles or laws which help explane observed phenomena, and which can be applied as widely as possible.

When I began this study seven years ago, I realised that there might be some regular pattern common to. Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates by A.

Gordon Edmund. Published by Life Sciences Division, Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. Written in EnglishCited by: Title. Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates / Related Titles. Series: Life sciences contributions ; no. 52 By. Edmund, A. Gordon. Royal Ontario Museum. texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK (US) Genealogy Lincoln Collection.

National Emergency Library. Top Full text of "Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates" See other formats. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link) http.

Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): ersitylibrary (external link). Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals.

Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates. Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth.

Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement. The dentition of agamid lizards with special reference to tooth replacement.

Journal of Zoology, EDMUND, A. Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates. Contributions. Life Sciences Division. Royal Ontario Museum, 52, 1 – HOPSON, J. Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates.

On a triconodont tooth of a new pattern from a fissure-filling in South Glamorgan. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London. The phylogeny of cranial kinesis in lower vertebrates with special reference to the Lacertilia. Abstract Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals.

Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in. Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates / Pages; Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates / By.

Edmund, A. Gordon. Royal Ontario Museum. Publication Details If you are generating a PDF of a journal article or book chapter, please feel.

The regulation of the pattern of tooth replacement in lower vertebrates is explored from a theoretical morphological perspective.

When inhibition zones are postulated as controls on the vertical and horizontal spacing of tooth germs, all replacement geometries of extant and fossil lower vertebrates can be simulated. Tooth replacement phenomena in the lower vertebrates.

Contributions. Life Sciences Division. Royal Ontario Museum, On the control of tooth replacement in reptiles and its relationship to growth. Journal of Theoretical Biology, Edmund, A. () ‘Tooth Replacement Phenomena in the Lower Vertebrates’, Contributions No.

52, Life Sciences Division, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto Google Scholar Fourie, S. () ‘Tooth Replacement in the Gomphodont Cynodont Diademodon’, S. Afr. Sci., 59, –13 Google Scholar.

Various theories have been put forward to account for the patterns of tooth replacement in non-mamma- lian vertebrates. Replacement patterns have been interpreted as resulting from stimuli moving along the dental lamina and initiating tooth production at indi- vidual loci, progressing from front to back of the jaw (Edmund, ).

The early stages of tooth development were studied from serial sections of a series of guinea pig (Cavia cobaya) upper replacing cheek tooth developed from the dental lamina lying anterior to the deciduous molar it displaces; the lower replacing cheek tooth developed from the lingual downgrowth of dental lamina associated with the posterior half of the enamel organ of the.

A general sequence of tooth replacement events has been suggested in reptiles, in which budding replacement teeth, lying in resorption pits, develop lingually to their corresponding functional teeth. As the new tooth develops, the attachment of the old functional tooth is weakened, the functional tooth is lost and the replacement tooth takes.

However, the bones on which the teeth sat might not be homologous to teeth-bearing bones in other gnathostomes, reflecting distinct evolutionary origins of teeth and jaw elements.The species also appears to be a promising subject for the further investigation1 oftooth replacement phenomena.

Peter Shellis, Tooth Replacement and Ontogeny of the Dentition, The Teeth of Non-Mammalian Vertebrates, /B, ( Later development in the lower jaws of embryos, hatchlings and young.In most reptiles, replacement teeth develop directly lingually to the corresponding functional teeth and lie in resorption pits at the bases of the latter, whereupon the attachment is resorbed, the functional tooth is lost and the replacement tooth takes its place.